Values, values, values

Actual values are the behavior and skills that are valued within the ‘fellowship’. The fellowship being the group of people pursuing some—noble—goal.

The Scrum Guide from 2016 pulls the Scrum values back into its center. Ken Schwaber and Jeff Sutherland call it the heart of Scrum.

The agile and lean frameworks, methods, and practices—like XP, Scrum and the Kanban Method—each have their own set of values. The total set counts 17(!) unique values:

  1. simplicity;
  2. communication;
  3. feedback;
  4. focus;
  5. courage (2×)
  6. openness;
  7. commitment;
  8. respect (3×);
  9. agreement;
  10. balance;
  11. collaboration;
  12. customer focus;
  13. flow;
  14. leadership;
  15. respect;
  16. transparency; and
  17. understanding.

The long list of values reminds me of a joke that emerged during the UNIX standardization battles:

The nice thing about standards is that there are so many to choose from.

How can you live all those values? Which one do you pick? Which value do you focus on?

Perhaps picking your 3–5 top values, share them with your fellowship, and then dot vote the result to distill 3–5 fellowship values: behavior and skills that are valued by most or all.

Perhaps gauging them on how they contribute to the Fantastic Five may help:

  1. Abundance—The byproducts of already having abundance rather than how much.
  2. Livelihood—The byproducts of doing, rather than what you will do.
  3. Health—All that your fantastic health makes possible.
  4. Relationships—The results of having a new or an improved relationship rather than who.
  5. Appearance—The effects of being pleased with yourself rather than diets, time lines, and body weight.

Anyway, what do you think?

Scrum values

The Scrum Guide lists the five Scrum values:

  1. Focus—We focus on only a few things at a time, work well together, and produce excellent work in order to deliver valuable items sooner.
  2. Courage—We work as a team, feel supported, and have more resources at our disposal in order to undertake greater challenges.
  3. Openness—We express how we’re doing, what’s in our way, and our concerns in order to mitigate or eliminate anything and everything that slows us down.
  4. Commitment—We have great control over our own destiny, and are more committed to success in order to live and work happier.
  5. Respect—We share successes and failures, in order to respect each other and to help each other become worthy of respect.

Goldilocks

Goldilocks-Sizing

  • Goldilocks is an interesting technique and basically doing the opposite of estimating: You shape the work into the desired sizes.
    Vote each item into one of three piles: “Too Big”, “Just Right”, and “Too Small”.
  • Split any “Too Big” items into “Just Right”-sized ones.
  • Group any “Too Small” items together into “Just Right”.

The Goldilocks Principle applied to sorting stories reminds of potato grading machines that sort potatoes into different sizes.

Enjoy the flow.

graderpotato

schouten-sorteermachine-met-opvoer-9

Source: InfoQ » Q&A on Kanban in Action.

Sprints are like a water tumbler

A sprint of one week is like a small bamboo water tumbler. Sprints of three weeks are larger, heavier and tumble a three times slower than the one week tumbler.

Your organization is like a web of bamboo water tumblers. Make sure they tumble with a synchronous or syncopic rhythm.

Rhythm creates momentum, momentum synchronizes all pulses in your organization.

Syncopation includes a variety of rhythms which are in some way unexpected which make an off-beat tune or piece of music. More simply, syncopation is a general term for a disturbance or interruption of the regular flow of rhythm: a placement of rhythmic stresses or accents where they wouldn’t normally occur.

All dance music makes use of syncopation and it’s often a vital element that helps tie the whole track together.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syncopation

Parachute Game

We started the morning with a parachute game.

Stolen with consent from Lachlan Heasman

Start at ground level, hold it over your head and do three steps forward. Next, sit on it. There it is, a parachute mushroom.

Parachute Game: Mushroom (photo stolen with consent from Lachlan Heasman)

Writer’s Workshop

ScrumPLoP Writer’s Workshop.

A very sketchy note of:
*[http://hillside.net/component/content/article/65-how-to-run-plop/235-how-to-hold-a-writers-workshop Hillside Group » How to Hold a Writer’s Workshop]; and
*[http://mummola.cs.tut.fi/~patterns/writers_workshop_cheatsheet.pdf Writer’s Workshop Cheat Sheet] (PDF).

Just let me know if you would like a sketch that’s a bit more polished, and I’ll draw one up.

Ready Equals Done

Scrum has much ado about Definition of Ready and Definition of Done.

The Definition of Ready for the current phase equals the Definition of Done for the previous. Likewise, the Definition of Done for the current phase equals the Definition of Ready for the next. They are the two sides of the same membrane.

cell-ready-done

So, why not simplify it and talk about the membrane only?

Continue reading “Ready Equals Done”