Life is a broccoli

Everything in life is a broccoli. Take a broccoli, and snap off a piece. The piece of broccoli is a broccoli in itself. Take that piece, and snap off yet another piece. Again, that piece is a broccoli in itself.

In short, broccoli is self-similar. It is fractal. It is a holacracy.

You will find broccolis all over the place.

A portfolio is comprised of products. A product or a system consists of essential parts. Each part consists of subparts, and so on.

An organization consists of units, divisions, departments, groups, teams, squads, individuals. All broccolis within broccolis.

An initiative consists of programs, programs, in turn, consist of projects, projects have milestones, milestones take a couple of sprints to complete, sprints take one or two weeks.

Values, values, values

Actual values are the behavior and skills that are valued within the ‘fellowship’. The fellowship being the group of people pursuing some—noble—goal.

The Scrum Guide from 2016 pulls the Scrum values back into its center. Ken Schwaber and Jeff Sutherland call it the heart of Scrum.

The agile and lean frameworks, methods, and practices—like XP, Scrum and the Kanban Method—each have their own set of values. The total set counts 17(!) unique values:

  1. simplicity;
  2. communication;
  3. feedback;
  4. focus;
  5. courage (2×)
  6. openness;
  7. commitment;
  8. respect (3×);
  9. agreement;
  10. balance;
  11. collaboration;
  12. customer focus;
  13. flow;
  14. leadership;
  15. respect;
  16. transparency; and
  17. understanding.

The long list of values reminds me of a joke that emerged during the UNIX standardization battles:

The nice thing about standards is that there are so many to choose from.

How can you live all those values? Which one do you pick? Which value do you focus on?

Perhaps picking your 3–5 top values, share them with your fellowship, and then dot vote the result to distill 3–5 fellowship values: behavior and skills that are valued by most or all.

Perhaps gauging them on how they contribute to the Fantastic Five may help:

  1. Abundance—The byproducts of already having abundance rather than how much.
  2. Livelihood—The byproducts of doing, rather than what you will do.
  3. Health—All that your fantastic health makes possible.
  4. Relationships—The results of having a new or an improved relationship rather than who.
  5. Appearance—The effects of being pleased with yourself rather than diets, time lines, and body weight.

Anyway, what do you think?

Just Say No

Just say no to make your yes mean something.

Spending your limited time on the things that really matter creates a more intentional and solid yes, builds trust and coherence.

If you believe that you must keep your promises, overdeliver and treat every commitment as though it’s an opportunity for a transformation, then the only way you can do this is to turn down most opportunities.

No I can’t meet with you, no I can’t sell it to you at this price, no I can’t do this job justice, no I can’t come to your party, no I can’t help you. I’m sorry, but no, I can’t. Not if I want to do the very things that people value my work for.

Yes is the future no—in other words, you are lying, often to your dear ones.

Say yes too often, and your body will automatically tell you no in no time.

No is the foundation that we can build our yes on.

Here are nine practices to say a strategic no in order to create space in your life for a more intentional yes.

  1. Know your no. Identify what’s important to you and acknowledge what’s not.
  2. Be appreciative.
  3. Say no to the request, not the person.
  4. Explain why.
  5. Be as resolute as they are pushy.
  6. Practice.
  7. Establish a pre-emptive no.
  8. Be prepared to miss out.
  9. Gather your courage.

Say no to all issues that do not align with values, goals and norms—that fall outside the tolerance of your self or your organization.

  • To say “Yes” is about quantity.
  • To say “No” is about quality.
  • To say “No” gives certainty, dependability, safety and sureness.

Approach (similar to process leading to consent):

  • Actively listen to the other’s question.
  • Say “No’”.
  • Show understanding for any response or reaction.
  • Provide a focused motivation of your “No”.
  • Find a solution that you both can live with.
  • Track progress.

Therefore:

Listen to the other’s request and provide an understanding “No”, along with its motivation. Find a solution that you both can live with and track progress.

Variations

  • Say “Yes, as soon as… (I’ve completed all these things first).”

Clear goal, simple rules

Dee-Hock-Clear-Goal-Simple-Rules

Simple, clear purpose and principles give rise to complex and intelligent behavior.
Complex rules and regulations give rise to simple and stupid behavior.
—Dee Hock, CEO Emeritus VISA International

From team charter:

  • Team—A group of people or animals linked in a unity of purpose.
  • Self-organization—The tendency of an open system to generate new structures and patterns based on its own internal dynamics. Organization design emerges from the interactions of the agents in the system; it is not imposed from above or outside. Facilitating Organization Change: Lessons from Complexity Science

Three factors influence the patterns that emerge:

  1. The container sets the bounds for the self-organizing system. It defines the “self” that organizes.
  2. Significant differences determine the primary patterns that emerges (power, level of expertise, gender, …).
  3. Transforming exchanges form the connections between system agents.

Just as a person needs time and space to incubate thoughts before a new Idea can emerge, a system needs a bounded space for the emergence of new patterns. Patterns imply structure, organization. Self-organizations gives you order for free. Effortless organization? don’t just do something, stand there!

Life is a serious game. life is a broccoli.

SixApart: Opening the Social Graph

SixApart: Opening the Social Graph:

We think that the best way for you to manage your network is to stop thinking about all of the little pieces and to start focusing on the big picture: you and the people who matter to you. We think relationships mean more than email addresses or which service you’re signed on to at the moment. So we’ve created an experimental demo based upon open technologies OpenID, the Microformats hCard and XFN, and FOAF that allow you to see your entire network of relationships in one place – across services, across platforms, across the entire Web.

How wonderful! I’ve been wanting this for ages! Even started the Campfire experiment a couple of years ago to address exactly this issue. I fully endorse opening the social graph.

(Via Semantic Wave.)

SwarmOS Demonstrated at Idea Festival

SwarmOS Demonstrated at Idea Festival: “PacoCheezdom writes ‘Intelligent Life has short summary of a demonstration by MIT professor James McLurkin of his new group-minded robots, which run an operating system called ‘Swarm OS’.

The robots are able to work together as a group not by communicating with all members of the group at once, but by talking only to their neighbors, and model other similar behaviors performed by bees and ants. ‘Read more of this story at Slashdot.

(Via Slashdot.)