RAMPS

RAMPS—Rhythm, Autonomy, Master, Purpose, Safety cheatsheet.

Click here or on image above ↑ for PDF.

Michael D. Hill introduces RAMPS as a motivation model: Rhythm, Autonomy, Mastery, Purpose, Safety. Michael even goes deep on Mastery as Motivator: The M of RAMPS. Next, Ron Jeffries sings harmony on RAMPS.

With kudos to Michael for writing this up, allow me to join the choral by capturing RAMP’s essence on a single sheet.

BTW, The original Daniel Pink’s Drive: The surprising truth about what motivates us is about AMP, which I associate with AMPlifier.

 

Hoshin Kanri X-Matrix

Use a visual tool to drive the right conversations on the right topic on the right time, and capture your vision, strategytactics, and evidence on a single A3, also known as the hoshing kanri x-matrix, in order to:

  • involve everyone in its cocreation;
  • make sure you are doing the right things;
  • align all stakeholders to create a laser focus on vital breakthrough aspirations;
  • focus all energy on a few crucial goals;
  • integrate daily management and operations with strategy;
  • provide structured and fast feedback to check progress;
  • stay on track and adjust course if needed.

A new design of the traditional hoshin kanri x-matrix aims to make it easier to read and maintain. Rather than having upside-down and vertical tekst, the new design only uses horizontal text.

Hoshin Kanri X-Matrix for Tesla
Hoshin Kanri X-Matrix example for Tesla (redesign of the 2010 version by Martien van Steenbergen; click to obtain PDF version).

A hoshin kanri x-matrix is:

  • holistic—covers all aspects and stakeholders of your enterprise;
  • fact- and evidence-based—crystal clear OKRs help drivers and leaders make timely and right decisions;
  • complete—plans are ready to execute when it is clear what you want to achieve and how you will approach it;
  • inclusive—involves everyone in the interactive cocreative process of catchball;
  • integrated—is integrated on all levels of your organisations, including incentive systems.

Hoshin (方針) means “compass (管理), or pointing the direction,” and Kanri means “management or control”. Combined, these two words show that hoshin kanri is essentially the process for Strategic Direction Setting.

Take a deep dive at hoshin kanri.

Flow vs Dual Track Development

Really love and fully agree with the gist of Jeff Patton’s Dual Track Development as well as Desirée Sy’s Adapting Usability Investigations for Agile User-centered Design. Throughout, there are different foci and kinds of work that are needed to evolve great outcomes. Yet, I don’t experience it as a dual track. Also, a dual track seems to split a joint effort into two groups or camps, with the danger of growing into silos and friction.

My image of this important work is much more flow minded. So, more upstream you will find people whose metier it is to continuously and fast discover, create, validate, learn about, and kill lots of ideas, promoting just a few that get fleshed out until they are ready to build by people whose metier it is to develop those ideas into an ever lasting stream of shippable revisions.

Everyone working in or on this flow aim to keep it flowing—No Business Like Flow Business™. Everyone is involved in and accountable for the flow as a whole, yet you spend most of your time in the area of your metier.

Plus, you will need a some people who focus on the big picture and optimise the wholeThe Flow Must Go On™.

Also, in flow there are no cycles, yet there is a rhythm:

Drums is the way to start music. To me, rhythm is right up the center of music, and if you start with the drums and get that right, then all the other stuff that requires brain and hard work has a place to go and it all fits much better.

—Peter Gabriel

Tonic’s Rules to Live by

Tonic’s “Rules to live by” are quoted without permission from a little booklet I got at the SIGGRAPH ’93.

Be kind

Put things where they belong. Few are won over by misplaced, misalinged, misdesigned anything. Form, really, is a function. Be kind to the user.

Observe a lot. Test everything—because sometimes “common sense” is neither.

It’s hard to make every product so understandable that people know how to use it before they pick it up. But it’s worth shooting for.

[Apple Powerbook (1991)]

Make things simple, but beautiful.

Elegant and timeless beat fancy, gimmicky, or slick. Any day.

[Digidesign RI recording controller (1993)]

Make people lust for it.

Give it a competitive advantage. Make it worth looking at. Worth holding. Worth using. Worth paying good money for.

If the guy next to you on the train had one, would you be more than a little curious? Envious? Good.

[Apple Newton prototype (1992) and Powerbook Duo (1992)]

Make it makeable.

It doesn’t matter how beautiful the thing is if you can’t manufacture it. Befriend the engineering team. Collaborate with the factory.

Instead of designing yourself into a corner, ask for their opinions. So you can produce it–by the thousands. By the millions. Affordably.

[Apple Personal Laserwriter (1990) and Macintosh IIci (1990)]

Invent the future.

If you don’t like your destiny, invent a new one.

Have some fun. Experiment.

Invent a new product category. (Or a whole new industry.) Invent a new design language. Reset the corporate compass.

“It can’t be done,” naysayers will declare. Don’t listen.

[AT&T Personal Communicator concept (1992), Apple Guide concept (1991) and Knowledge Navigator concept (1987)]


© 1993 Tonic Industrial Design, Palo Alto, California, (415) 325-1326, (415) 326-4678, fax. All rights reserved.

People, Product, Process


Fatal error: Uncaught Error: Call to undefined function split() in /www/aardrock.com/www/wp-content/plugins/wp-mediawiki.php:705 Stack trace: #0 [internal function]: WikiText->wikilink_callback(Array) #1 /www/aardrock.com/www/wp-content/plugins/wp-mediawiki.php(130): preg_replace_callback('/\\[{2}([^\\||^\\]...', Array, '\nSo, everything...') #2 /www/aardrock.com/www/wp-content/plugins/wp-mediawiki.php(989): WikiText->transform('\nSo, everything...') #3 /www/aardrock.com/www/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php(298): wpwiki('So, everything ...') #4 /www/aardrock.com/www/wp-includes/plugin.php(203): WP_Hook->apply_filters('So, everything ...', Array) #5 /www/aardrock.com/www/wp-includes/post-template.php(240): apply_filters('the_content', 'So, everything ...') #6 /www/aardrock.com/www/wp-content/themes/twentyseventeen/template-parts/post/content.php(57): the_content('Continue readin...') #7 /www/aardrock.com/www/wp-includes/template.php(690): require('/www/aardrock.c...') #8 /www/aardrock.com/www/wp-includes/template.php(647): lo in /www/aardrock.com/www/wp-content/plugins/wp-mediawiki.php on line 705